The Tycoon’s Secret Daughter by Susan Meier

The Tycoon’s Secret Daughter is a simple novel about Max, an ex-alcoholic man who found his ex-wife, Kate, in a hospital with Trisha, a daughter he had never known. Apparently Kate left Max after witnessing his drunken rage and was pregnant the whole time and Max didn’t know about it for years. The  majority of the plot is about Max wanting to know his daughter and subsequent asking for Kate’s forgiveness and reconcile their relationship.

The plot (the girl have a baby and later the guy find out) have been overused in so many Harlequin books and in its entirety, it was disappointing for something that was just written and published recently. But eventually I finished the book yesterday in its predictable glory. Some reviewers have low threshold on the predictability range, me on the other hand need to read hundred books with the same plot to endure the unexciting nature of it. Its very sad since I really like the plot with the main male character having a drinking problem and struggling to undo his past but the way the author try to play it up weakened the entire storyline. Since its a average romance, we all know they’ll be together, but the problem is, Kate gave up to him so easily and Max remained unconvincing in his emotive state. I do read books with characters with serious addiction problems but the author decided to focus the romance aspect of the book instead of Max’s problem on psychological level. Besides, he was an ex-drunkard who is destructive, that can be enhanced into a better character progression instead of mellowing the matter. Harlequin authors need to be decisive and creative with their plots when they have a good start to begin with.

I never intended to review this book because I read through it and only notice several parts until I finish with it. But if you wanted the “secret child” storyline in Harlequin, this book is not for you even if you wanted some light readings.

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